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Judge the nation or the king?

New article: “Why did God sometimes judge the entire nation for the actions of its king?”

Excerpt:

Sometimes in biblical history, an entire kingdom seems to be judged for the actions of one wicked king. For example, 2 Chronicles 28:19 says, in part, “The LORD had humbled Judah because of Ahaz king of Israel.” How is it fair that all of Judah was judged because of King Ahaz’s transgression?
The full story is that the kings in these accounts were not the only sinful people in the nation. To continue 2 Chronicles 28:19, the verse also says, “For he had promoted wickedness in Judah and had been most unfaithful to the LORD.” Thus, both King Ahaz and the people of Judah were involved in sinful actions, including idolatry. Ahaz had been the promoter and facilitator of the sin, but the whole nation stood guilty of committing the sin. When judgment on a nation was pronounced, it was typically addressed to the king. As the ruler of the nation he was held responsible for the actions of his people.
When a good king arose, we find that his noble actions also influenced the people he led. For example, during the reign of good King Asa of Judah, Asa “deposed his grandmother Maakah from her position as queen mother, because she had made a repulsive image for the worship of Asherah. Asa cut it down, broke it up and burned it in the Kidron Valley” (2 Chronicles 15:16). He led the nation toward righteousness and was rewarded with no war for many years (verses 18–19).

Read more - http://www.gotquestions.org/God-judge-nation-king.html

#QuestionoftheDay: Fantasy, Christian, BDSM, Teen… should Christians read any or only certain types of romance #novels? http://www.gotquestions.org/Christian-romance-novels.html

#QuestionoftheDay: Fantasy, Christian, BDSM, Teen… should Christians read any or only certain types of romance #novels? http://www.gotquestions.org/Christian-romance-novels.html

Splitting hares

Not trying to split hares (pardon the pun) with this one, but, here’s a new article: “Why does the Bible say that rabbits chew the cud? Is this an error in the Bible?”

Excerpt:

In the Mosaic Law, animals were divided into two broad groups: clean and unclean. Rabbits were placed in the “unclean” category, which means they could not be used as sacrifices and could not be eaten by the Jews. The rabbit’s “unclean” status was based on this description: “The rabbit, though it chews the cud, does not have a divided hoof; it is unclean for you” (Leviticus 11:6). This verse is often used as an example of an error in the Bible, since rabbits and hares do not chew cud.
Rabbits definitely do not “chew the cud,” in the modern, scientific sense of that English phrase. That’s irrelevant, however, since the Bible was not written in modern English. What matters is what the translated phrase meant in Hebrew at the time it was written. What rabbits and hares do is called “refection” or “coprophagy,” and it involves re-digesting food after it passes out of the body (in other words, rabbits eat their own feces). Rabbits are also known to constantly move their mouths, in a motion that looks extremely similar to the chewing motion of cows and other ruminants. What’s described in Leviticus 11:6 is meant for simple identification, not detailed scientific analysis.

Read more - http://www.gotquestions.org/rabbits-chew-cud.html

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